Hey, Folks, it’s the House Healthcare Bill By Request! Section 312 Subsections B and C

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(in radio-guy voice) Welcome to Tommy eh-eh-eh-X’s House Healthcare Morning Zoo! (funny sound effect)  This next request comes from the poster with the most-er, the tweep who will make you weep, Kimberly HANEYYYYY! (cue sexy sax music)

Kimberly writes in “Dear Tommy EH-EH-EH-X!!! (explosion sound effect), please decipher Pg 145 Line 15-17 – in your words, please.”

Happy to do it, Kimmie, so buckle the (BLEEEP) up, baby, ‘cus here..it..COMES!

15 (4) AUTOENROLLMENT OF EMPLOYEES.—The

16 employer provides for autoenrollment of the em

17ployee in accordance with subsection (c).

OK, rockers, rollers, and feisty town-hallers, let’s check out su-su-SUBSECTION C!!!

20 (c) AUTOMATIC ENROLLMENT FOR EMPLOYER SPON

21SORED HEALTH BENEFITS.—
22 (1) IN GENERAL.—The requirement of this sub

23section with respect to an employer and an employee
24 is that the employer automatically enroll suchs em

25ployee into the employment-based health benefits

Page 148

1 plan for individual coverage under the plan option
2 with the lowest applicable employee premium.
3 (2) OPT-OUT.—In no case may an employer
4 automatically enroll an employee in a plan under
5 paragraph (1) if such employee makes an affirmative
6 election to opt out of such plan or to elect coverage
7 under an employment-based health benefits plan of

8fered by such employer. An employer shall provide
9 an employee with a 30-day period to make such an
10 affirmative election before the employer may auto11
matically enroll the employee in such a plan.

12 (3) NOTICE REQUIREMENTS.—
13 (A) IN GENERAL.—Each employer de

14scribed in paragraph (1) who automatically en

15rolls an employee into a plan as described in
16 such paragraph shall provide the employees,
17 within a reasonable period before the beginning
18 of each plan year (or, in the case of new em

19ployees, within a reasonable period before the
20 end of the enrollment period for such a new em21
ployee), written notice of the employees’ rights
22 and obligations relating to the automatic enroll

23ment requirement under such paragraph. Such
24 notice must be comprehensive and understood

page 149

1 by the average employee to whom the automatic
2 enrollment requirement applies.
3 (B) INCLUSION OF SPECIFIC INFORMA4
TION.—The written notice under subparagraph
5 (A) must explain an employee’s right to opt out
6 of being automatically enrolled in a plan and in
7 the case that more than one level of benefits or
8 employee premium level is offered by the em9
ployer involved, the notice must explain which
10 level of benefits and employee premium level the
11 employee will be automatically enrolled in the
12 absence of an affirmative election by the em

13ployee.

This is actually a great provision, and an essential consumer protection.

What it means is that, if your employer provides health coverage, they have to enroll you in the cheapest plan if you don’t pick one or say you want no plan at all within 30 days.  You, the employee, retain complete control, but this protects someone who, maybe, loses the information in the mail, or whose boss waits too long to explain the benefits available, or even your forgetful husband/wife who keeps leaving the enrollment form under his or her coffee cup in the morning.

Without this provision, if you miss the enrollment cutoff, you are screwed until the next open enrollment period.  That’s 1 year without insurance.

Just to anticipate possible misreadings of this, this provision has nothing to do with the public option, and does not constitute a mandate for coverage.  Read the bolded sections.

If you have a question about the health care bill, send ’em to The Zoo at TommyXtopher@aim.com, and don’t forget to duh-duh-duh-DONATE! (cash register noise)

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5 Comments

  1. A useful provision indeed! I’m happy with it.

    Excellent radio show atmosphere!

  2. Hey Tommy,
    Thank you for answering this question. Being a conservative, self-employed business owner, you can hopefully understand that I have some angst about this bill. There are several things that I don’t like, the $400K payroll cutoff that adds the additional 8% fine/tax (whatever you want to call it) is only one that springs to mind immediately. What I want to see is some serious debate on the items that are truly scaring our seniors, our self-employed and the parents of children with disabilities. I know you don’t like her, but you have to give credit to Sarah P. for putting the “death panel” issue out there because it not only became a debate, but a national protest! These politicians need to learn that we the PEOPLE need to be able to understand this bill completely, to voice our opinions, and yes – complain if we don’t like it. I realize that a lot of folks out there are slamming ALL segments of the bill – they want it eighty-sixed and started again from scratch. I think there are some bright spots in it, but it is filled with so many open ended items that could lead to other resolutions on the back end that are harmful, and face-it, downright scary (like having the government have access to my bank account). There-in lies the fear and you have done an exceptional part in quelling the fear aligned to this particular topic. I want you to know that I appreciate your journalistic fervor, and while I do not always agree with you, I do respect you and your integrity. Carry on.

  3. I agree with what you say about the debate, but it rankles me that so much honest skepticism is based on deliberate misinformation, and I put death panels at the top of that list.

  4. Tommy, thanks for doing things like this…it urks me how all this spin is being treated as the gospel fact..

    This is what it will take, to help inform folks.

    As soon as we are not partialy unemployeed here in our household, you can bet I’ll be contributing to the cause here on the Dose.

    until then, hang in there and do what you can, its all greatly appreciated.

  5. Awww, thanks Michelle 🙂


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